Студопедия Главная Случайная страница Обратная связь

Разделы: Автомобили Астрономия Биология География Дом и сад Другие языки Другое Информатика История Культура Литература Логика Математика Медицина Металлургия Механика Образование Охрана труда Педагогика Политика Право Психология Религия Риторика Социология Спорт Строительство Технология Туризм Физика Философия Финансы Химия Черчение Экология Экономика Электроника

Comparing stories. In what ways does the life of this modern-day young woman differ from that of other women in the stories you have read in this collection (particularly Lorna




 

In what ways does the life of this modern-day young woman differ from that of other women in the stories you have read in this collection (particularly Lorna in "You Should Have Seen the Mess", Naomi in "Sweet Sixteen" or Anna in "Mannequin"). Your teacher may ask you to do this task as homework and discuss your comparisons in one of the next lessons.


оглавление

Предисловие..................................................................................................... 3

 

A Guide for complex stylistic analysis............................................................ 4

Murray Bail "The Silence".............................................................................. 5

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 11

Style and language.......................................................................................... 11

Further discussion........................................................................................... 11

Muriel Spark "You Should Have Seen the Mess"........................................ 13

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 21

Style and language.......................................................................................... 21

Further discussion........................................................................................... 22

Doris Lessing "Through the tunnel"............................................................ 23

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 35

Style and language.......................................................................................... 36

Further discussion........................................................................................... 36

John Wain "Manhood".................................................................................. 37

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 49

Style and language.......................................................................................... 50

Further discussion........................................................................................... 50

James Joyce "Counterparts"......................................................................... 51

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 65

Style and language.......................................................................................... 66

Further discussion........................................................................................... 66

E. M. Forster "Other Side of the Hedge"..................................................... 67

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 74

Style and language.......................................................................................... 74

Further discussion........................................................................................... 75

James Thurber "Secret Life of Walter Mitty"............................................... 76

 

Understanding the story.................................................................................. 83

Style and language.......................................................................................... 84

Further discussion........................................................................................... 84

John Steinbeck "The Murder"...................................................................... 85

 

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 100

Style and language........................................................................................ 101

Further discussion......................................................................................... 101

Alan Sillitoe " On Saturday Afternoon"..................................................... 103

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 114

Style and language........................................................................................ 114

Further discussion......................................................................................... 115

Elizabeth Bowen "The Demon Lover"....................................................... 116

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 125

Style and language........................................................................................ 126

Further discussion......................................................................................... 126

Katherine Mansfield "Feuille d`Album".................................................... 127

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 135

Style and language........................................................................................ 136

Points for discussion..................................................................................... 136

Ernest Hemingway "Indian Camp"............................................................ 137

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 142

Style and language........................................................................................ 142

Further discussion......................................................................................... 143

Michelene Wandor "Sweet Sixteen"........................................................... 144

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 149

Style and language........................................................................................ 149

Points for discussion..................................................................................... 150

Jonathan Carroll "Waiting to Wave"........................................................ 151

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 157

Style and language........................................................................................ 157

Points for discussion..................................................................................... 158

Graham Greene "The Case for the Defence"............................................. 159

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 164

Style and language........................................................................................ 164

Points for discussion..................................................................................... 165

Virginia Woolf "Uncle Vanya"................................................................... 166

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 168

Discussion and comment.............................................................................. 168

Summary and composition.......................................................................... 169

Comparing stories......................................................................................... 169

Saiki (Hector Hugh Munro) "The Open Window".................................... 170

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 174

Discussion and comment.............................................................................. 174

Summary and composition.......................................................................... 175

Comparing stories......................................................................................... 175

Jean Rhys "Mannequin".............................................................................. 176

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 183

Discussion and comment.............................................................................. 183

Summary and composition.......................................................................... 184

Comparing stories......................................................................................... 184

Mei Chi Chan " Snowdrop"........................................................................ 185

 

Understanding the story............................................................................... 189

Style and language........................................................................................ 189

Discussion and comment.............................................................................. 189

Summary and composition.......................................................................... 190

Comparing stories......................................................................................... 190


 

 

Букина Вера Александровна

 

 

Analytical Reading

 

 

Учебно-методическое пособие

по аналитическому чтению

на английском языке

 

Подписано в печать 24.01.2011.

Формат 60х84/16. Усл. печ. л. .

Тираж экз. Заказ № .

 

Редакционно-издательский отдел

Московского государственного областного гуманитарного института.

142611, Московская область, г. Орехово-Зуево, ул. Зеленая, д.22.


[1] to squat = to sit on one's heels

[2] Aborigine = a native inhabitant of Australia

[3] singlet = a sleeveless running vest

[4] garbage = rubbish

[5] to scatter = to throw in all directions

[6] to burrow = to dig a tunnel

[7] to labour = to work hard

[8] to thud = to make a heavy, low sound

[9] to strode – strode- strode = to walk with long, firm steps

[10] sweat=perspiration

[11] carcass= dead of body of an animal

[12] To clunk=to make a dull, heavy noise

[13] sport (Australian slang) = mate

[14] cuppa = cup of tea

[15] to gulp = to swallow quickly

[16] to slurp = to drink noisily

[17] juice (slang) = petrol

[18] grub (slang) = food

[19] to throb = to beat dully

[20] saltbush = low desert bushes

[21] billy (Ausrtalian slang) = can for boiling water

[22] to part=to separate

[23] to tread-trod-trodden=(here) to walk slowly

[24] to poke around=to move around inspecting things

[25] rowdy=excessively noisy

[26] scrape = (here) the sound made when two hard objects are rubbed together

[27] to leap - leapt - leapt = to jump very vigorously

[28] intruder a; a person who comes when he is not expected or wanted

[29] dingo = wild Australian dog

[30] mottle = marks or spots on the skin

[31] bow-legged = with legs curved outwards, like bows

[32] to crouch = to squat

[33] to weave = (here) to travel in a zig-zag around obstacles

[34] to rev up = to accelerate a motor or engine

[35] bumper-bar = protective bar at the front and back of a vehicle

[36] intently = very carefully

[37] to clamber = to climb clumsily

[38] what's-his-name = a phrase used when you cannot remember a person's name

[39] gloss = paint that shines like water

[40] to chip = to break a piece of material (paint etc.) off the edge of an object

[41] solicitor = lawyer and notary

[42] element = (here) the porcelain tubes of a gas fire which glow red-hot and give out the heat

[43] box file = a flat cardboard box in which documents are kept.

[44] to crumple = to press a piece of paper (cloth, metal etc.) together so that it is no longer smooth and flat

[45] enough saucers to go round = enough saucers for everybody

[46] to go into = to discuss, to mention

[47] the facilities = (here) the toilets

[48] to harbour = to offer a place of safety

[49] germs = bacteria

[50] Telly (slang) = television, TV

[51] rickety = unstable, shaky

[52] to do (a room) up = to redecorate

[53] spick and span = clean and tidy

[54] agency = (here) employment agency

[55] well spoken = speaking with an educated accent

[56] prescription = doctors's written order for medicine which the patient takes to a chemist's

[57] maternity dress = loose dress worn by pregnant women for five of six months before their babies are born

[58] lino = linoleum, floor covering

[59] shabby = old and worn

[60] garments = clothes

[61] to evict = to throw someone out of his flat or house

[62] houseproud = someone who keeps the house very tidy could be called "houseproud"

[63] to pee (vulgar) = to urinate, to pass water

[64] to make a match for someone = to introduce a girl to a boy with a view to marriage

[65] to take someone up = (here) to take an interest in someone

[66] orphan = child or young person whose parents have both died

[67] down and out = without a home or steady job, (here) shabbily dressed

[68] to make a comparison with = Lorna probably means: to make a change from

[69] help=home help, a person who comes for a few hours each day to clean the house

[70] labour ward = the part of a hospital in which babies are born

[71] carry-cot = small, box-like, portable bed for small babies

[72] gob (slang) = mouth

[73] tumble-down = ready to fall down, likely to collapse

[74] to re-house someone = to move someone from an old building to a new (Council) house

[75] to keep at someone = to continually put pressure on someone

[76] to condemn (a house) = to say that a house is not fit for people to live in

[77] Welfare Centre = a room in a block of council flats where the residents can go for group activities or for help from social workers etc.

[78] social intercourse = a rather pompous term for "communal activities", "conversation", etc.

[79] to make a pass at a girl = to try to kiss, to make (unwelcome) amorous advances at a girl

[80] tramp = homeless vagabond, usually dressed in very old clothes

[81] primrose = creamy yellow, the colour of the primrose flower

[82]equality = the state of being equal to, on the same level with someone

[83] greasy = covered in grease or fat

[84] to ooze = to pass slowly through a small opening (usually used of thick liquids like mud, artists' paint etc.)

[85] frown = opposite of a smile

[86] conscientiously = showing a sense of duty

[87] tolong for something = to want something very much

[88] contrition = a sense of guilt

[89] chivalry =here) politeness, protectiveness

[90] to blurt out = to say something suddenly and without thinking

[91] unbearable = too difficult to bear or put up with

[92] an only child = a child who has no brothers or sisters

[93] a widow = a woman whose husband is dead

[94] devotion = deep, strong love

[95] to gain = (here) to reach

[96] a scoop = (here) a half-moon shape

[97] fringed = edged

[98] promontory = a thin strip of land which stretches into the sea

[99] inlet = an arm of the sea which stretches into the land

[100] to stain = to colour (usually wood, glass, textiles etc.)

[101] to gleam = to shine brightly

[102] limb = arm or leg

[103] buoyant = capable of carrying or supporting

[104] cape = piece of land that stretches far out into the sea

[105] a scatter = (here) a number of objects spread out in no definite order

[106] at a stone's throw = not too close

[107] a craving = an uncontrollable desire

[108] alert = watchful

[109] supplication = a humble prayer

[110] to stray from = to wander away from

[111] to haul oneself up = to pull oneself up with difficulty

[112] to poise oneself = to balance oneself (before jumping etc.)

[113] sleek = smooth

[114] a yell = a loud, frightened shout

[115] to splutter = (here) to spit out water

[116] a gasp = a sudden, deep breath

[117] to chatter = to talk quickly

[118] to grope = to feel one's way in the dark

[119] a school = (here) a swarm of fish

[120] to loom (up) at = to appear in an indistinct and threatening way

[121] to bob = to move quickly up and down

[122] to sting = to give a short, sharp pain

[123] a feat = a difficult and often dangerous action or task

[124] gravely = seriously

[125] to plead = to beg

[126] to waggle = to move quickly from side to side

[127] to surge = to push forward suddenly and strongly

[128] thigh = upper part of the leg

[129] fanged = (here) having sharp teeth (= fangs)

[130] to be flushed = (here) (to be red (after exposure to the sun)

[131] goggles = protective glasses worn by motor-cyclists, swimmers etc.

[132] to pant = to breath rapidly when one is excited or out of breath

[133] defiant = showing open resistance or disobedience

[134] to beseech = to plead, to ask in a begging way

[135] inquisitive = expressing curiosity or suspicion

[136] casually = (here) in a slow, unworried way

[137] to nag = (here) to repeat a request continuously

[138] to pester = to annoy someone (with constantly repeated requests)

[139] to grab = to take something roughly and selfishly

[140] to waver = to move unsteadily to and fro

[141] slate = smooth grey stone that splits easily into thin layers

[142] a dart = (here) a quick movement

[143] to swerve off = to turn quickly to the side

[144] sequin = tiny metal disc usually sewn on ladies' clothing

[145] minute = very tiny

[146] innumerable = too many to count

[147] sheer = vertically upwards

[148] tufted = (here) carrying tufts or small bunches

[149] a chestful = the amount of air needed to fill one's lungs

[150] to hug = to hold very close

[151] obstacle = object which prevents one from moving forward

[152] to clamber = to climb with difficulty using one's hands and feet

[153] to cling to = to hold very tightly to something

[154] clung = past tense of "cling"

[155] to be jammed = to be pushed into a small opening so tightly that movement is impossible

[156] clammy = cold, wet and clinging

[157] frond = long, thin leaf of a water plant of fern etc.

[158] bled = past tense of "bleed"

[159] dizzy = unable to keep one's balance

[160] to overdo something = to do a thing for too long, to work too hard

[161] a torment = something which causes severe bodily or mental pain

[162] persistence = ability to carry on doing something (often a difficult task)

[163] jut = a piece of something that sticks out

[164] incredulous = full of disbelief

[165] strain = (here) showing signs of discomfort

[166] authorized = (here) made official

[167] limp = not stiff or firm but loose

[168] to throb = to pulsate, usually used of repeated spasms of dull pain

[169] to tremble = to shake or shiver

[170] to wriggle = to move one's body like a worm

[171] rock-bound = surrounded by rock

[172] to inflate = to fill with air

[173] to pulse = to throb, to beat with a regular, dull movement

[174] slimy = wet and slippery

[175] to tangle = (here) to wrap itself around

[176] panicky = caused by panic or fear

[177] convulsive = accompanied by a sudden contraction and expansion

[178] to pale = to grow lighter in colour

[179] to swell = to grow larger

[180] to pound = to beat very hard

[181] feeble = without strength

[182] a lapse = (here) a fall

[183] to clutch = to (reach out and) hold very tightly

[184] to clot = when blood thickens it forms clots

[185] a gout = a large splash of thick, spilled liquid

[186] to scoop up = to lift up in the hollowed hand

[187] to fling - flung - flung = to throw violently

[188] glazed-looking = looking as if they were covered with thin glass

[189] to fuss = to show unnecessary nervous excitement

[190] swiftly = rapidly

[191] to free-wheel = to cycle downhill without moving the pedals

[192] haunch = the upper part of the leg where it joins the body

[193] a rise = (here) a gently sloping hill

[194] the fatigue barrier = like the sound barrier - a borderline which one has to cross in order to defeat tiredness and exhaustion

[195] to wear off = to become less painful, attractive, distinct etc.

[196] sullen = silently and quietly bad-tempered

[197] to slide - slid - slid = to move smoothly along a surface

[198] full-length = the whole length of one's body

[199] to row = to move a boat through the water using long sticks, flat at the ends, called oars

[200] aware = realizing

[201] to nag = to constantly criticize or keep repeating a request

[202] a corpse = a dead human being

[203] awkward = difficult, causing trouble

[204] a punch-ball = an oval ball usually fixed to the floor on an elastic stand and used by boxers to practise their hits or "punches"

[205] to drag = to pull a heavy object along the ground: (here) to force someone to do something he doesn't really want to do

[206] Insecurity = lack of stability - either physical, mental, social etc.

[207] a heritage = what has been passed on to one generation by a preceding one; (here) the results of what one has - or has not - done earlier in one's life

[208] common sense = practical knowledge of what is right or wrong gained from direct experience in life, not from book-learning

[209] to beam = to smile very happily

[210] to deal - dealt - dealt = to distribute; (here) to deal a blow = to hit

[211] to peel something off = to pull off something that fits tightly

[212] to pad- to fill something with a soft material for added comfort or to prevent injury

[213] to slip something on = to put on a piece of clothing without fastening it conscientious

7 conscientious = guided by a sense of duty

8 to aim at something = to point a hand, gun, spear etc. at something with the idea of hitting it

 

[214] a landmark = an easily recognizable geographical feature; (here) an important happening in a person's life

[215] attentively = giving close attention

[216] weave = the way the yam (or threads) of a piece of cloth are linked together to form the cloth

[217] a trial game = a game in which a sportsman's suitability to become a member of a team is tested

[218] biceps = the large muscle at the top of the arm

[219] weight = boxers are classified by weight: flyweight, heavyweight etc.

[220] tournament = sports or games competition where Individuals or members of a team play against each other in pairs (chess, boxing, show-jumping etc.)

[221] to compress = to press together very firmly

[222] brain = the grey material inside the head with which we think

[223] skull = the case of bones which surrounds the brain

[224] to be in charge of something = to be responsible for something

[225] to stuff = to push a large item into a small hole or space

[226] a satchel = a bag made of leather, plastic or canvas in which British schoolchildren carry their school books

[227] hot-eyed = with eyes full of anger

[228] school badge = most British schools have not only an official uniform but an official emblem often heraldic – which identifies them as members of a particular school

[229] to sew - sewed - sewed/sewn = to fix one piece of cloth to another using a needle and thread or sewing machine

[230] to sob = to make sharp, breathing noises when one is crying

4 to quack = to make the kind of noise that ducks make

5 a tout = a brutal, bad-mannered person

6 to take a grip on oneself = to pull oneself together, to control one's emotions

7 a (boxing) ring = the square platform on which boxing matches take place

[234] to make a fuss = (here) to show one's worries or emotions openly

[235] appendicitis = disease of the small, worm-like extension of the intestine which often requires an operation to cure

[236] deceitful = a person who tells a lie or pretends that something is true when it is not is deceitful

[237] my pet = (here) my darling

[238] to jabber = to talk quickly and in a high voice, so that understanding is difficult

[239] a flannel = a piece of cloth used for washing one's face or body

[240] M.A. = Master of Arts - normally the second academic degree (after B.A. - Bachelor of Arts) awarded by a British university to students of non-scientific subjects. The next-higher degree is that of Doctor of Philosophy.

[241] lead = a soft, heavy metal, chemical symbol

[242] hearty = excessively cheerful, often used, as here, in a slightly negative sense

[243] to go in for something = to organize something or participate in it

[244] curriculum = list of subjects and activities taught at a school or university

[245] to hesitate = to wait for a moment before doing something, as if in doubt as to the correctness of the action

[246] tube = (here) speaking tube, primitive type of telephone used 80 years ago

[247] to pierce = to cut a hole with a sharp point

[248] Blast him! = Damn him! Curse him!

[249] to buldge = to swell outwards

[250] vexation = anger at something unimportant

[251] gold-rimmed = with gold edges

[252] to shirk = to avoid (responsibility, work etc.)

[253] a course = a full meal consists of several courses: soup, main course, dessert etc.

[254] to mind = (here) to remember

[255] to gauge = to measure or estimate

[256] a sensation = (here) a feeling

[257] an order on the cashier = a note ordering the cashier to pay part of his wages in advance

[258] Upon my word! = (exclamation) My goodness!

[259] to slake a thirst = to get rid of a thirst

[260] plaid = cloth with a chequered or tartan pattern

[261] rickety = likely to break or collapse

[262] furtively = secretly, like a thief

[263] a snug = a private room in a pub where a person can drink alone

[264] inflamed = swollen and red

[265] g. p. = "glass of porter" (dark beer)

[266] curate = (Irish) bar assistant

[267] at a gulp = swallowing it in one mouthful

[268] a caraway seed = a spicy seed that would hide the smell of the beer

[269] dusk = time between sunset and complete darkness

[270] pungent = sharp and stinging

[271] to cram = to push something into a small space

[272] to intimate = to indicate indirectly

[273] Look sharp! = Be quick!

[274] to be sweet on someone = to have an amorous liking for someone

[275] to swivel = to turn an object which can rotate on a fixed base

[276] jauntily = in a carefree demonstration of self-confidence

[277] intently = very carefully, with great attention

[278] hot punch = drink made of wine or spirits and hot water

[279] to execrate = to curse

[280] to revel = to have a happy, lively time

[281] a spell of riot = a period of violent behaviour

[282] to abstract = (here) to confuse

[283] a tirade of abuse = a long, angry speech containing insults

[284] manikin = small man

[285] utter = complete

[286] felicitous = fortunate, lucky

[287] stout = rather fat

[288] to flush = (here) to turn red

[289] a hue = a colour or shade

[290] to twitch = to move in quick, uncontrollable movements

[291] a dwarf = a small, undersized person

[292] impertinent = cheeky

[293] ruffian = rough person

[294] instanter = (Latin) instantly

[295] abject = degrading

[296] a hornet's nest = a place full of enemies (hornet = large wasp)

[297] to hound someone out = to chase someone away

[298] to pull together = to work in harmony

[299] two establishments to keep up = two homes to look after

[300] to touch someone = (here) to ask someone for money

[301] a bob (slang) = a shilling (5p)

[302] a pawn office = a place where money is lent

[303] the dart (slang) = the solution

[304] a crown = a five-shilling piece

[305] consignor = person who leaves an article at a pawn-office

[306] urchin = small, cheeky child

[307] evening edition s= evening newspapers

[308] to swish = to make a sound like running water

[309] trolley = the small contact wheel between a tram and the electric power wire

[310] to preconsider = to think about

[311] to stand someone a drink = to buy someone a drink

[312] a half-one = half a pint of beer

[313] tailors of malt = glasses of Irish whiskey

[314] all round = for everybody

[315] a retort=a witty reply

[316] eclogues = short poems about shepherds and country life

[317] to polish off = to finish off

[318] to name your poison = to say what you want to drink

[319] vivacity = liveliness

[320] exhilarating = making lively or happy

[321] my nabs = (here) myself (humorous)

[322] to bevel off = to turn away

[323] to drizzle = to rain in small tine drops

[324] a knock-about artiste = a comedian or actor who plays in slapstick comedies

[325] to leer = to smile in a way that suggests evil desire

[326] to chaff someone = to make fun of someone

[327] a tincture (humorous) = a drink

[328] a parlour = a private room in a pub

[329] mellow = happy and slightly drunk

[330] muslin = very thin, tine cotton cloth

[331] oblique = diagonal, sideways

[332] a sponge = (here) a person who drinks at others' expense

3 biceps= the large muscle at the top of the arm

4 to clasp = to hold firmly, to grasp

5 humiliation = loss of self-respect or dignity

6 a stripling = a half-grown man, a youth

7 peony = garden plant with large red flowers

 

[338] the knack = the correct way to do something

[339] to put in one's gab (slang) = to speak without permission

[340] Pony up! (slang) = Drink up! (and get ready to leave)

[341] a smahan = (Irish) a little drop

[342] sullen-faced = with a face showing silent bad-temper

[343] to smoulder = to burn slowly, without flames

[344] to reek = to smell strongly

[345] fury = intense anger

[346] to choke = to prevent from breathing

[347] a barracks = a building where soldiers live

[348] to loathe = to hate

[349] to bawl = to shout

[350] to bully = to use strength or power to hurt another, weaker person

[351] to peer = to look closely at something, usually in conditions where it is difficult to see

[352] a chapel = a small church

[353] to whimper = to make weak, frightened sounds, like a small dog

[354] a whelp = a young dog

[355] to utter = to let out a sound

[356] thigh = the top part of the leg

[357] a Hail Mary = a Catholic prayer to the Virgin Mary asking for God to forgive a sinner

[358] pedometer = instrument that measures distances walked

[359] to outstrip someone = to overtake someone, to go faster than someone

[360] to jeer = to laugh rudely or without respect

[361] resentful = full of bitterness

[362] to exhort = to encourage

[363] to persevere = to keep on making an effort

[364] to oppress = (here) to cause a feeling of discomfort

[365] to be strewn = to be covered

[366] weary = extremely tired, exhausted

[367] prostrate = lying flat on one's face

[368] parched = very dry through lack of water

[369] a puff = a light breath

[370] glint = a reflection of sun on water

[371] morbid = diseased, unhealthy

[372] to yield = to give in

[373] to scrape = to remove by friction

[374] to be wedged = to be stuck tightly in a narrow opening or passage

[375] to wriggle = to move from side to side like a worm

[376] undergrowth = bushes, tall grass or small trees that form a barrier

[377] dazed = in a confused condition, shocked

[378] beech = forest tree with shiny dark-green leaves and small triangular nuts

[379] a fold = (here) a gentle valley

[380] meadow = a grass-covered field

[381] occupation = (here) being lived in

[382] a moat = a circle of water often used to protect a castle

[383] to out-distance = to walk faster than

[384] to keep step with someone = to move at the same speed as someone

[385] to injure = to hurt, to damage

[386] to be engaged in = to be busy with

[387] startled = surprised and frightened

[388] to tear = (here) to run very fast

[389] bewildered = very confused

[390] to murmur = to speak very quietly

[391] an achievement = a success

[392] a link = one ring of a chain

[393] to span = to bridge a stream or river

[394] ivory = the material of which elephants' long teeth are made

[395] amazement = great surprise

[396] humanity = the human race, mankind

[397] to seize = to take hold of something firmly

[398] to deny something = to say that something is not true

[399] obstinacy = stubbornness, the quality of not giving way

[400] to double = to turn around and go in the opposite direction

[401] a boundary = a border

[402] mankind = the human

[403] to be determined = to have made a firm decision

[404] cattle = collective and generic term for all cows, bulls and calves

[405] to be troubled by = to be very worried at

[406] a scythe = a farm implement with a long, curved blade used for cutting grass or corn

[407] destiny = goal towards which an individual or group is led by the external forces of fate

[408] to wrench = to pull vigorously with a twisting action

[409] to overcome = to be too strong for

[410] braid = gold or silver thread wound into thick strands and used for decorating uniforms or officers' caps

[411] rakishly = at an angle

[412] it's spoiling for a hurricane = a hurricane is starting

[413] Rev her up! = Increase the engine speed!

[414] auxiliary = extra motor which gives more power

[415] turret = small tower, steel structure to protect gunners

[416] to hurtle = to move forward at great speed

[417] hydroplane = a fast motor-boat with a flat bottom

[418] grossly = extremely

[419] to yell = to shout or scream

[420] to be tensed up = to be the opposite of relaxed

[421] overshoes = winter shoes worn over normal shoes

[422] to race an engine = to speed up a car engine when the car is not moving

[423] Pick it up! = Move on!

[424] a cop (slang) = a policeman

[425] to lurch = to move forward suddenly or drunkenly

[426] a parking lot (American) = a car park

[427] distraught = upset, extremely worried

[428] haggard = looking tired as a result of worry or lack of sleep

[429] obstreosis = invented medical term suggesting an obstruction

[430] ductal tract = invented medical term: all "tracts" are "ducts"!

[431] to take coals to Newcastle (proverb) = to waste time and effort: Newcastle was the town from which coal was sent to other towns

[432] an intern(e) = a young doctor who is completing his training at a hospital

[433] a fountain pen = a pen with an internal supply of ink

[434] coreopsis = invented medical term suggesting a serious complication

[435] craven = cowardly

[436] grave = serious

[437] Mac (American) = form of address to a person whose name you don't know

[438] lane = (here) part of the road reserved for one line of traffic

[439] to vault = to jump (usually over a gate or fence)

[440] insolent = cheeky

[441] cocky = Insolent, cheeky

[442] chains = snow chains fixed to a car's driving wheels in winter

[443] a wrecking car (American) = a breakdown van

[444] a sling = a bandage fastened round a person's neck to support a broken arm

[445] bicarbonate = (NaHCOs), used as a medicine to cure acidity in the stomach

[446] carborundum = hard material made of carbon and silicon and used for polishing metal

[447] referendum = a word used out of context simply because it rhymes with " carborundum"

[448] the what's-its-name = a word used for a thing you can't remember

[449] a buzz = a noise like that made by a bee or other insect

[450] to rap = to hit (here: with a hammer)

[451] a crack shot = a person who shoots very accurately

[452] insinuatingly = suggestively

[453] to bicker = to argue about something unimportant

[454] pandemonium = complete confusion

[455] bedlam = pandemonium, noisy confusion

[456] to let someone have it = to hit someone

[457] a cur = a dog

[458] to be through = to be finished

[459] a lobby = an entrance hall

[460] cannonading = constant firing of heavy guns

[461] to get the wind up in someone = to frighten someone

[462] tousled = uncombed

[463] the Archies = Walter Mitty's invented nickname for the Germans

[464] an ammunition dump = a place where ammunition is stored

[465] Spot of brandy? = Would you like a drop of brandy (cognac)?

[466] a dugout = a shelter for soldiers made by digging a hole in the ground

[467] a rending = a sound of wood breaking

[468] a box barrage = another invented word for gunfire coming from all directions towards a target in the centre

[469] faint = hardly noticeable

[470] fleeting = passing quickly

[471] Cheerio! = Good-bye! (typically British)

[472] derisive = laughing, expressing contempt

[473] a firing squad = a group of soldiers selected to execute a criminal

[474] erect = upright

[475] disdainful = proud

[476] inscrutable = mysterious, difficult to understand

[477] range = line of mountains

[478] spurs and ridges = a ridge is the top edge of a long mountain and a spur is a ridge stretching out sideways into a valley

[479] arroyo = (Spanish) narrow valley cut by a stream

[480] sage = (here) silver-grey plant that grows on mountains or dry areas of the USA

[481] buttressed = supported by stone columns built against the walls

[482] Crusader = soldiers who tried to capture Jerusalem from the Turks in the Middle Ages

[483] stratified = in layers

[484] battlements = flat roof of a tower or castle from which soldiers can shoot arrows through holes in the wall

[485] arrow slit = narrow vertical hole through which soldiers can shoot arrows

[486] warped = twisted, bent

[487] to defy = to resist openly

[488] to trespass = to enter a house or piece of land without the owner's permission

[489] morbid = concerned with unhealthy or horrible things

[490] plump = rather fat

[491] awe = great respect

[492] grained = showing the natural lines of the wood

[493] manger-rack = rack or holder in which animals' food (usually hay) is placed

[494] majority = (here) the age of 21, when a person is no longer a "minor"

[495] stock = (here) all the animals on a farm

[496] a doe = a female deer

[497] bleary = dim, tired-looking

[498] bloated = swollen

[499] Jelka's father's English is not very good. He means: "She's"

[500] He's not like a man = She doesn't like a man

[501] to giggle = to laugh in a silly or nervous way

[502] to nudge = to push gently (often with the elbow, to attract attention)

[503] Scripture = the Bible

[504] interminable = endless

[505] a range = an open piece of prairie where cattle can feed

[506] a stallion = a male horse

[507] hostile = unfriendly, like an enemy

[508] to whimper = to make a whining noise like a small dog

[509] to lapse into = to become once again

[510] to crave = to have a great wish for something

[511] vulgarity = rudeness or roughness

[512] a scabbard = a long leather or metal case to hold a sword or rifle

[513] a buckboard = a light cart for passengers and goods

[514] to gabble = to talk quickly and incomprehensibly

[515] to kneel – knelt – knelt = to rest on one's knees

[516] tacked = attached with small nails (= tacks)

[517] oats = type of grain used for making porridge or feeding to horses

[518] flat = (here) flat field

[519] band = line or row

9 to clank = to make a rattling noise of metal on metal

 

[520] to hitch up a rig = to harness a cart

2 to hatch = chickens hatch out of eggs

3 dusk = the time between sunset and total darkness

4 serge = hard-wearing woollen cloth

 

 

[521] a halter = a leather strap put around a horse's head to lead it

2 a bay gelding = a reddish-brown horse that has been castrated

3 halter-strap = strap on a halter which holds the horse's head

4 buckle = metal fastening device as on a belt

5 to cinch = (here) to fasten a saddle

6 bridle = part of the horse's harness which goes over its head and nose

7 throat latch = buckle for the strap under the horse's throat

8 to slip = to remove

9 radiant = shining

10 a carbine = a rifle

11 a cartridge = a cardboard cylinder containing gunpowder and the bullet

 

 

[522] velvet = cloth with a thick, soft layer of fine hairs on one side

2 rooster = male chicken

3 to canter = to ride a horse at slightly faster than a trot

4 a springboard = a high place where a stream begins

5 a calf = a young cow or bull

6 a brand = a mark burned on the skin of a calf to indicate its owner

 

[523] to cut up through = to take a short cut through

[524] stilted = stiff and unnatural

[525] a grove = a small wood

[526] a hogback = a smooth, round hill

[527] a hide = an animal skin

[528] a pasture = a piece of land on which cattle graze

[529] a corral = an enclosure where horses are kept

[530] to creep – crept – crept = to walk very quietly and slowly

[531] the bit = the part of a horse's harness which is held in its mouth

[532] the finish = the polish or paint on a metal or wooden surface

[533] to peer = to look at something under difficult conditions, when it is dark or when one is short-sighted

[534] to twitch = to move suddenly in a convulsive movement

[535] barley = type of grain used for making beer and whiskey

[536] mosquito wrigglers = mosquito larvae (they wriggle like snakes in the water)

[537] a newt = a small salamander-like creature that lives in water

[538] a sob = a sharp breathing sound made by someone who is crying

[539] to whisk along = to move along quickly

[540] to stir = to move in a circular motion, like a cup of tea

[541] to cock a rifle = to prepare it for firing

[542] to stir = (here) to move

[543] to quiver = to shake slightly

[544] the sights = the points at the front and back of a rifle barrel along which one takes aim

[545] to jolt = to make a sudden jumping .movement

[546] a hollow-point = a bullet with a hollow point which becomes flat on hitting the target

[547] to gurgle = to make a sound like a drowning man

[548] to shudder = to shake

[549] to whine = to make a high-pitched noise like a dog

[550] uneasy = restless, worried

[551] a pair (of horses)

[552] a coroner = an official who decides the causes of sudden deaths

[553] to be wrought up = (American) to be nervous and upset

[554] to tend to things = to look after things

[555] to saunter away = to walk off in a relaxed, unhurried way

[556] a comfortoer = (American) a bed cover

[557] to dismiss a case = to reject or throw a case out of court

[558] Go kind of light (slang) = Don't be too hard

[559] to jolt away = to move off in an unsteady way

[560] reluctantly = unwillingly

[561] viciously = with great force

[562] a loaded bull whip = a heavy whip with extra weight (= loaded)

[563] a hay-loft = the top part of a barn where the hay is stored

[564] a bandana = a neck-scarf

[565] gravely = seriously

[566] a blowfly = a large fly which feeds on meat or dead animals

[567] to struggle = (here) to move with difficulty

[568] to limp = to walk stiffly, especially when one leg is injured

[569] lumber = wood for building

[570] bloke (slang) = man

[571] fed-up = unhappy with life, bored

[572] 'course (coll.) = of course

[573] to string oneself up = to hang oneself

[574] he ain't (slang) = he hasn't, he isn't

[575] fags (slang) = cigarettes

[576] to come for someone = to attack someone

[577] Sunday-Joint = as big as a large piece of meat eaten on Sundays

[578] maulers (slang) = hands

[579] to scrunch = (here) to bend

[580] to clear out (slang) = to get out

[581] bleddy (dialect) = bloody

[582] to hunch = to pull one's back into a round shape

[583] broody = thinking sad thoughts

[584] to go crackers = to go mad

[585] to mash tea (dialect) = to make tea

[586] clink (slang) = prison

[587] plugged = (here) without the energy to leave, stuck

[588] summat (dialect) = something

[589] a bookie (slang) = a bookmaker, a man who takes bets on horses, dogs etc.

[590] a bookie (slang) = a bookmaker, a man who takes bets on horses, dogs etc.

[591] a parson = a vicar in the Church of England

[592] to droop = to hang down

[593] a square meal = a proper meal

[594] to gossip = to talk about other people

[595] to trudge = to walk in a tired way

[596] a pawnshop = a shop where money is lent in return for a valuable object left as security

[597] to 'ang messen wi' (dialect) = to hang myself with

[598] to cackle = to laugh loudly, like a hen

[599] a good 'un (dialect) = a good one (= joke)

[600] a coil = a circle of rope etc.

[601] a bogger (dialect, usually «bugger» = silly or nasty person (a taboo word!)

[602] it did him for what he wanted =it suited his purpose

[603] It wain't (dialect) = It won't

[604] to get nettled = to get angry

[605] to scram (slang) = to run away, to disappear

[606] a fancy knot = a complicated (and nice-looking) knot

[607] Shut yer gob (slang) = Shut your mouth

[608] pally = friendly

[609] bits and bobs (coll.) = bits and pieces, odds and ends

[610] a pawn ticket = a receipt from a pawnshop for goods left there

[611] coppers (slang) = bronze coins, pennies and halfpennies

[612] ter (dialect) = to

[613] gi' (dialect) = give

[614] like it was (dialect) = as if it was

[615] missus (coll.) = wife

[616] worse luck (coll.) = what a pity

[617] clock (slang) = face

[618] mam (dialect) = mum, mother

[619] to lead someone a dog's life = to make life very unpleasant for someone

[620] to pop = (here) to get larger

[621] a goz (dialect) = a look

[622] the scouts = the Boy Scouts

[623] to have one's cake and eat it = to have a double (advantage)

[624] tit for tat = to have something in return for something else

[625] a butt-end = the end of a cigarette

[626] to sling – slung – slung (coll.) = to throw

[627] firegrate = the part of a fireplace where the coal burns

[628] to wriggle = to twist from side to side

[629] a runner (coll.) = a run

[630] Notts Forest = famous football team (Nottingham Forest)

[631] muffler = scarf

[632] to chafe = to rub together

[633] a scarecrow = a large doll used by farmers to frighten birds

[634] to flap = to move quickly up and down

[635] a dose of salts = an amount of Epsom Salts, magnesium sulphate

[636] dizzy = feeling as if things are turning around

[637] a thump = a loud blow

[638] colic = severe stomach pains

[639] to tut-tut = to express disapproval

[640] a balls-up (slang) = a mess

[641] to slam = to shut violently

[642] so's (coll.) = so that (so as)

[643] a copper (slang) = a policeman

[644] to stride = to walk with long steps

[645] to nark (slang) = to inform the police

[646] to tip off = to give information to

[647] happen (dialect) = perhaps

[648] to catch on (coll.) = to understand

[649] peepers (slang) = eyes

[650] an approved school = a school for young criminals

[651] to pinch (slang) = to steal

[652] lead = a soft metal, chemical symbol Pb

[653] to croak = to make a sound like a frog

[654] Nay (dialect) = No

[655] to let on to someone = to tell a secret to someone

[656] tek (dialect) = to take

[657] to be in for it = to be in trouble

[658] six-months cold (slang) = six months in prison

[659] the Post = a newspaper, the Nottingham Post

[660] of an evening (coll.) = in the evenings

[661] dishing grub (slang) = serving food

[662] to spill (slang) = to tell

[663] daft = stupid

[664] to cease = to end

[665] to chuck (coll.) = to throw

[666] issen (dialect) = himself

[667] to go for a pee (coll.) = to go to the toilet

[668] Not much 'e aint (dialect) = he certainly is (understatement!)

[669] bastard = (here) fool

[670] a ward = a hospital room with several beds

[671] a double-decker = a large bus

[672] that= (here) so

[673] barmy (coll.) = crazy, mad

[674] to go out = (here) to die

[675] to scream blue murder = to scream very loud

[676] humid = damp or moist

[677] a batch = a group

[678] a parapet = a wall raised higher than the roof of a house or building

[679] to silt up = to become filled with mud, like a river that flows too slowly

[680] a latchkey = a key to open the lock on a front door

[681] to warp = to become twisted out of shape

[682] ajar = slightly open (of doors and windows)

[683] to unshutter = to remove the shutters or boards in front of a window

[684] prosaic = normal, dull, uninteresting

[685] escritoire = writing desk (French word)

[686] a bruise = a blue mark left on the skin after a hard knock or blow

[687] to seep in = to come in through a small opening or crack ?

[688] hearth = fireplace

[689] a caretaker = a man who looks after a building

[690] a shaft = a long thin ray

[691] refracted = bent aside

[692] a circular = a printed letter sent to many people

[693] negligence = lack of responsibility, carelessness

[694] rank = luxuriant, with too many leaves, too tall (grass)

[695] to feel intruded upon = to feel that one is being watched

[696] contemptuous of = with no respect for

[697] stealthily = secretly and quietly

[698] assent = approval, giving permission

[699] intermittent = coming and going

[700] a flicker = (here) a sudden movement

[701] precipitately = suddenly

[702] a chest = a large wooden box for storing clothes etc.

[703] apprehension = fear or unhappy feeling about the future

[704] a leave = a short holiday for soldiers, airmen etc.

[705] to intimidate = to frighten, to fill with fear

[706] spectral = ghostly

[707] a drawing-room = a room in a large house where guests go after meals (= withdrawing room – to withdraw = to leave)

[708] to catch one's breath = to take a sudden, inward breath of excitement, fear etc.

[709] a fiance = a man whom a woman has promised to marry

[710] to perceive = to notice

[711] to drive down between = to separate

[712] all human kind = the whole human race

[713] to be foresworn = to be rejected

[714] to plight a troth (old-fashioned) = to give a promise (especially of marriage)

[715] without stint = without limit, without sparing oneself

[716] to console = to comfort

[717] dislocation = (here) separation, estrangement

[718]on this score = in this matter

[719] to court a girl = to try to win a girl's love

[720] arboreal = with many trees

[721] to circumscribe = to limit

[722] desuetude = unusualness

[723] to rally oneself = to regain one's strength, confidence etc.

[724] to dwell == (here) to remain thinking about

[725] to fly = (here) to run away

[726] a keystone = a stone that holds the other stones of an arch together

[727] cut off = (here) disconnected

[728] to tug = to pull hard

[729] flight = escape (from: to fly)

[730] to be set on someone = to be determined to marry someone

[731] acuteness = clarity, sharpness

[732] weal = mark left on the skin by a sharp object, scar

[733] to slip = to walk unobserved and quietly

[734] passe air = air that has not been renewed, used air

[735] to emanate = to come

[736] a thoroughfare = a main road

[737] a creek = a small river; (here) a little-used road

[738] a tread = a footstep

[739] to debouch = to open out onto like a river into the sea)

[740] a perambulator (old-fashioned) = a pram

[741] a barrow = a handcart with one wheel at the front

[742] a taxi rank = a section of the street where taxis wait for customers

[743] to pant = (here) to come running up out of breath (= panting)

[744] to recollect = to remember

[745] a jolt = a sudden bump

[746] to fling - flung - flung = to threw

[747] an aperture = an opening

[748] to issue = to give, to make a sound

[749] to make off with someone = to run away with a person

[750] feuille d'album = poem or contribution written in an album

[751] tortoise stove = slow-burning, iron stove (brand name of a stove with the trade mark of a tortoise and the slogan: Stow but sure)

[752] to drift = to move slowly and without a goal, like something floating on water

[753] to pout = to push one's lips forward

[754] wrung = twisted (to wring - wrung - wrung) like one twists a wet cloth to press out the water

[755] crimson = bright red

[756] tender = gentle

[757] to rouse = to awaken or excite s.o.

[758] gloom = darkness

[759] to turn a hair = to show any signs of emotion

[760] to blossom forth = to open up like a flower (= blossom)

[761] rag-time = jazz

[762] show = art exhibition

[763] fishy = suspicious

[764] daisy = simple wild flower with white petals and a yellow centre which grows in most gardens and meadows

[765] mournful = sad, dreary

[766] to gteam = to shine

[767] forlorn = very sad

[768] concierge = (French) = caretaker

[769] to ladle out = to take out of a saucepan with a large spoon (= ladle)

[770] tit-bit = especially delicious item of food, news etc.

[771] to loll = to lie around lazily

[772] bead cushion = cushion ornamented with small glass pearls

[773] to perch = to sit like a bird on a branch or (in a cage) a wooden rod (= perch)

[774] fringe=edge

[775] shabby = worn and threadbare (of clothes), not in good condition (of houses etc.)

[776] frill = ornamentation around the edge of a hat, skirt, dress etc. (often unnecessary)







Дата добавления: 2014-11-12; просмотров: 381. Нарушение авторских прав


Рекомендуемые страницы:


Studopedia.info - Студопедия - 2014-2019 год . (0.266 сек.) русская версия | украинская версия