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UNIT TEN





Task 1.Listen to the recorded words. Write them down in transcription. Practise their pronunciation and spelling.


Accountant

Air-steward

Architect

Baby-sitter

Au pair

Caretaker

Thumbs

Butcher

Civil servant

Clerk

Flexi-time

Computer operator

Programmer

Interior decorater

Chemist

Driver instructor

Redundant

Dustman

Engineer

Executive

Lieutenant

Hair stylist

Jeweler

Mechanic

News presenter

Photographer

Pilot

Police officer

Psychiatrist

Unemployment

Refusal

Full-time

Colonel

Employment

Flair

Physiotherapist

Undertaker

Genuine

Retirement

Maternity

Shift-work

Reliable

Tiring

Carpenter

Principal


Task 2.Group the words in Task 1 according to their stress patterns. Offer three examples for each stress pattern.

Stress on the 1st syllable Stress on the 2nd syllable Words containing two stresses Others
       

Task 3.Listen to the words in Task 1.Choose the nouns designating jobs. Use proper adjectives to describe the specificity of each job. Do it writing.

Task 4.Read the following pairs of sentences. Specify theirrhythmic structure, mark boundaries between the rhythmic groups.

He was spoken of highly there.

He was speaking of Helen there.

 

They were laughed at nearly everywhere.

They were laughed at nearly everyone.

 

They were talked about in their hometown.

They were talking about in their hometown.

Task 5.Compare the sets of English and Ukrainian vowels. Describe the differences in their pronunciation and number. Enumerate the vowels which are similar in both vowel systems. Explain the differences in the pronunciation of vowels in the following pairs of Ukrainian and English words. Do it in writing.


steel

brood

front

block

bark

some

store

cut

cord

clammy

look


Task 6.Listen to the following dialogues and exercises carefully, sentence by sentence. Write them down, lay stresses and tone marks, practise reading them. Make sure you imitate the speakers intonation. Give Ukrainian equivalents to the replies. Give graphical presentation of intonation of the words and expressions conveying apology and the reaction to it. Learn to use proper expressions and intonation patterns to react adequately to the apology.

Thompson P.8-14

Ex. 12

ëSorry.

èSorry, ™Jo.

èSorry, Im ™late.

èSorry, Im ™late, .Bob.

èSorry, Im |so ™late, .Bob.

èSorry, to |ring you so ™late.

èSorry, to |ring you so ™late, .David.

Ex. 14a) Alan: Hello, Sarah. Sorry to keep you waiting.

Sarah: |Not at \all.

b) Harriet: Hello, David. Sorry to keep you waiting.

David: |Thats all /right.

c) David: Sorry to keep you waiting, Alan.

Alan: I should |think |so \ too.

1. Last night there was a noisy party until three in the morning. You could not sleep at all, you are tired and angry now: I should |think |so \ too.

2. Harriet has broken your favourite cup, but it was an accident: - |Thats all /right.

3. You are expecting a telephone call from David, and he rings you at 9:30 in the evening. - |Not at \all.

Ex.15. a) David: Do you know Sarahs address, Harriet?

Harried: Im afraid I dont, David.

b) Mr.W: Can you speak Spanish, Miss Roke?

Miss R: Im afraid I cant Mr Watkins.

Mr.W: Can you speak Ugdi?

Miss R: Im afraid I cant.

Mr.W: And do you know the capital city of Ugdistan?

Miss R: Im afraid I dont.

Mr.W: So you havent been to Ugdistan?

Miss R: Im afraid I havent.

Task 7. Read the text given below. Make sure you understand what it is about. Divide each sentence into syntagms, lay stresses and tone marks, practise your reading technique. Record your reading.

Somerset Maugham says of a character in one of his stories: She spoke English perfectly, but with a slight accent. The probable explanation of this apparent contradiction is that the slight accent refers to certain inconformities in her pronunciation of the sounds of the language, while the perfectly applies to her intonation. A foreigner who speaks a language with correct stressing and intonation but with incorrect sounds (within reasonable limits) will be better understood by natives than one who sounds correct but whose stressing and intonation are poor. The considerable effort required of the native to grasp the latters meaning acts as continual reminder that he has no instinctive feeling of the language and is therefore an outsider, whereas the natural delivery of the former earns him a ready welcome and acceptance in cultured circles.

Intonation is the soul of a language while the pronunciation of its sounds is its body, and the recording of it in writing and printing gives a very imperfect picture of the body and hardly hints at the existence of a soul.







: 2015-09-04; : 1030. ; !

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